Our mission

Our Mission

uniting our community and resources to build racial equity and opportunities

WELCOME

2021 marks the beginning of our new strategic plan — LIVE UNITED 2025.

LIVE UNITED 2025 gives us a new mission and specific, measurable goals.

Our mission is uniting our community and resources to build racial equity and opportunities for all Rhode Islanders.

Racism, health, justice, and economics

2020 spotlighted the failure for us, and everyone involved, of the war on poverty. After 50 years, this effort has been ineffective in creating opportunity and prosperity for all members of our community.

The pandemic showed that where you live and the color of your skin is a powerful determinant of your likelihood to live or die from COVID-19. And, murders of our neighbors like George Floyd and Breonna Taylor remind us that Black Rhode Islanders are eight times as likely to be in jail as whites.

That’s why we felt it was so important that our plan explicitly address systemic inequity – i.e., policies that promote unequal opportunity and treatment of people of color. We know it’s the right thing to do morally. It’s also the smart thing to do economically.

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Going deep, rather than wide

The plan will require United Way of Rhode Island to go “deep, rather than wide,” with investments and partners, to target the root causes that have thwarted Rhode Island’s ability to thrive. While we serve all Rhode Islanders in need, this plan will tackle Rhode Island’s great challenge, reversing the racial inequities that have plagued Rhode Island’s Black and brown communities for generations.

In order to “Live United,” we must dismantle systemic, institutional, and historical barriers based on race, gender, sexual orientation, and other identities. We commit to leveraging all of our assets (i.e., advocacy, convening, fundraising, strategic investments, awareness building) to create a more equitable Rhode Island.

LIVE UNITED 2025 strategic plan

The LIVE UNITED 2025 strategic plan will guide United Way of Rhode Island’s next five years from 2020 until 2025, just in time for our centennial celebration. You can download our full strategic plan below. Alternatively, you can read about what we’re doing right now in each of its four focus areas:

  • LIFT UNITED: Building economic security. (Learn more)
  • ACHIEVE UNITED: Advancing childhood learning. (Learn more)
  • INVEST UNITED: Expanding philanthropy. (Learn more)
  • ADVOCATE UNITED: Driving policy and participation. (Learn more)
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Truly a united effort; please join us

The LIVE UNITED 2025 strategic plan is rooted in data and guided by feedback from thousands of Rhode Islanders over the past few years. We are abundantly grateful to the thousands of individuals who contributed to the transformative plan that will guide our important work together and to those who support us.

I hope you’ll join us in this journey to make sure Rhode Island is a place where every individual in each community has equal opportunity for justice and prosperity.

Cortney Nicolato
President and CEO

HISTORY

From our inception in 1926, United Way of Rhode Island has effectively moved people from crisis to stability while working to shore up the systems that provide support across the community.

And, when called to action in the face of a global pandemic, we proved that we were built over the last 95 years as the best organization in the state to effectively harness resources from government, corporations, nonprofits and individuals to address the many major crises affecting all of us.

1926

Providence Community Fund formed to combine the fundraising efforts of various agencies and distribute fund according to where the community assessed the greatest need.

1926

Under Henry Sharpe’s leadership first president and campaign chair, raised more than $480,000 in a remarkably successful one-week campaign in October.

1935

Cranston joins forces with us to conduct a single community fund campaign.

1937

Royal Little, founder of Textron, established a trust fund administered by the Rhode Island Foundation that to this day pays the organization’s fundraising and administrative costs.

1938

The Hurricane of 1938 devastates the state, stretching the ability of the fund’s agencies to meet community needs. It also floods our headquarters on Weybosett Street, damaging or destroying most records.

1941

Community funds or chests in Blackstone, Burrillville, Central Falls, Cranston, Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, Warwick and Woonsocket joined forces with us as United Campaigns of Community Chests to create a stronger sense of statewide unity in philanthropic work.

1942

United Campaigns of Community Chests becomes Rhode Island United War Fund and raises $2.1 million meet the burdens World War II placed on families, especially those with loved ones in the military.

1943

Compulsory withholding of income and social security taxes created the payroll deduction option as a method of donating to workplace campaigns. This remains the favored method of pledging for United Way to this day.

1946

War over, the War Fund was reestablished as Rhode Island Community Chests.

1955

Rhode Island Community Chests became United Fund and began to focus more on accountability of donor investment.

1960s and ’70s

“Great Society” social programs led to duplication of efforts between long-established private agencies and newer government entities.

1973

United Fund becomes United Way of Southeastern New England to recognize donors from and services provided in neighboring Massachusetts and Connecticut.

1990s

Developed Critical Issue Funds in the 1990s to encourage more experimental and collaborative solutions to key issues, like Making It Work and Community Schools-RI.

2002

Renamed United Way of Rhode Island, adopted a new mission: To mobilize the caring power of the community to improve the lives of people in need.

2004

Convened community summits encompassing 800 individuals to identify key problems faced by the community, then defined programs and funding priorities in three impact areas: solutions for children, youth and families; helping people in crisis; and building adult and neighborhood independence.

January 2005

Under new CEO Tony Maione, awarded first-ever competitive grants. More than $9 million was awarded to 66 organizations for 77 programs. Twenty-six had never received funding before from United Way’s general fund.

2006-2012

Awarded two rounds of three-year grants totaling $25.8 million to scores of social service organizations in Rhode Island, generating measurable results to create a better community and to be relevant to donors. Combined grantmaking with advocacy and public policy work.

2008

New headquarters at 50 Valley Street comes alive with community organizations and people in need of service from United Way 211 in Rhode Island.

2018

CEO Tony Maione passes the baton to Cortney Nicolato in time to convene community members in a new strategic planning process.

2021

Launch LIVE UNITED 2025 strategic plan with new mission: Uniting our community and resources to build racial equity and opportunities for all Rhode Islanders. Establish specific, measurable goals for 2025.

Roshni Darnal is United Way of Rhode Island’s director of community investments. / Courtesy United Way of Rhode Island.

Five Questions With: Roshni Darnal

Providence Business News

Roshni Darnal is the director of community investments for United Way of Rhode Island... where she manages the organization's strategic direction to address the needs of Rhode Islanders through its grantmaking processes… Darnal spoke with Providence Business News about those grantmaking changes and what it means for the nonprofit community moving forward.

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FCARI: Prescription Delivery Services for Seniors

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 89% of adults 65 and older take prescription medicine. For seniors who have mobility issues or are unable to leave their homes to go to the pharmacy, using a prescription delivery service is a simple solution.

This resource provides seniors and their caregivers with the top prescription delivery services, information on financial assistance options, and guidance on choosing the best service for their specific needs. Learn more at: www.caring.com/best-prescription-delivery-services/

Providence Business News Best Places to Work RI Awards Winner 2023 logo.

PBN announces 2023 Best Places to Work honorees

Providence Business News

Sixty-seven honorees, including United Way of Rhode Island, have been named by Providence Business News for its 2023 Best Places to Work Awards program... The honorees will be recognized June 7 for their efforts in a ceremony at Crowne Plaza Providence-Warwick in Warwick, where the company rankings in each category will be announced.

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United Way Selects Leaders for Executive Director Learning Circle

Laser-focused on its work to support the needs of the state’s nonprofit community… United Way of Rhode Island has kicked off its latest Executive Director Learning Circle. The organization has selected 11 local nonprofit leaders to participate in the yearlong program that focuses on strategic development and increasing their organizations’ capacity to deliver their social impact work.

401Gives Registration Is Open to All Rhode Island Nonprofits

401Gives is returning on Monday, April 1, and United Way of Rhode Island invites all local nonprofits to participate and raise funds to support their mission-driven work. This year’s 401Gives is the fifth anniversary of what is the Ocean State’s largest single fundraiser to benefit and uplift the nonprofit sector.

Rhode Islanders Can Find Help With Medicare Open Enrollment

United Way of Rhode Island is offering assistance to those age 65 and older and adults with disabilities who need help enrolling in or reviewing their Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage plans for 2024 coverage. The current open enrollment period ends on Dec. 7 and is the only time at which individuals can make changes.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Workforce Alliance Kick-Off

Wednesday, March 6, 2024
3 - 4 p.m.
RI State House Library

The Workforce Alliance is a partnership among adult education workforce training providers, business, labor, philanthropic organizations, and community leaders dedicated to ensuring that Rhode Island has a dynamic and comprehensive workforce development system that meets the needs of employers and workers. The Workforce Alliance is kicking off the legislative session to bring attention to adult education and workforce development policy priorities.

Emerging Leaders Welcome Celebration

Thursday, March 14, 2024
6 - 7:30 p.m.
The Guild, Pawtucket

Join us for a night of networking, learning, and a chance to become an Emerging Leader!

Emerging Leaders (EL) provides the avenue for early to mid-career professionals to take action and make the most impact in their communities through volunteer service, networking opportunities, impact-focused professional development, and philanthropy. Join us to take the next step in your career and make change happen in Rhode Island!

Register